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Contained herein are the mysteries of magic and song, politics and love, holidays and games—the details that epic journeys are made of.


Einvigi


Einvigi is a Chaldean military-themed board game that abstractly simulates warfare.Einvigi_Miniatures_02_187x500

Invented in Tavja long ago as an alternative method of settling disputes between warlords, Einvigi has been extensively modified over the centuries to include military forces of most human, orc, dwarven, and elven armies. With its roots in Tavja, the game has naturally included lion riders since its outset.

Einvigi is played on a board, which is often handcrafted by enthusiasts to depict a specific battleground, historical and imaginary. The game is played with “toy soldiers,” typically carved from wood and sometimes hand-painted. An Einvigi game can be quite simple, well-used, and homemade, or it can be an elaborate set created by an artisan for the amusement of nobility.

The game is well-known throughout Chaldea, most popular in Tavja and the other human kingdoms of Niessia. The Einvigi Guild has local chapters in nearly every major city.

The use of Einvigi to settle disputes is rare, however, outside of Tavja.

Governor Hellwig Gustavus has acquired fame as an Einvigi master. He has won multiple tournaments, and weekly Einvigi games are required of his officers. Hellwig has also created several Einvigi boards with corresponding scenarios based on battles he has fought. He is just one example of the many Einvigi fans in Chaldea.

It was only natural that Hellwig would raise his son, Reiswitz, to also enjoy Einvigi. At age fourteen, Reiswitz won the Hesse National Einvigi Championship, and by his late teens he had designed and published more scenarios than his father.

Reiswitz gained additional international acclaim in Einvigi circles with the publication of Advanced Einvigi, a rules variant for playing Einvigi without a board, using sand as a play surface and measuring strings to calculate distance for movement and for firing ranged weapons. After countless hours of play, an extensive reorganization and edit by Sarva, Advanced Einvigi is now in its second edition.

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Einvigi_Miniatures

In Chaldea: War Room, Duke Seifried asks Reiswitz if they are playing “an elaborate Einvigi match.” Indeed, they are playing Reiswitz’s advanced version of the game, which is why Duke doesn’t quite recognize it.


Kordavan Calendar


The Kordavan Calendar is the official system for tracking time, especially years, in the world of Chaldea.

Until the Kordavan Empire, Chaldea had numerous calendars, most based on the astrological cycle while counting time from the current king of that region. Others were more bizarre. Only highly trained scribes knew most of them, and it’s likely no one knew them all. Many kingdoms used the Pert system because the Perts had colonized so much of Chaldea, but this system was clunky, based as it was on the reigns of various kings. Thus, to know history, you’d have to know the genealogy of all Pert kings. Other countries had similar systems. For their part, the dwarves could have established a worldwide calendar, but they simply couldn’t agree on which clan’s system to use, something they still argue about today. Most wizards used the elven calendar, as did Aimilleuse.

Once he took the throne as emperor, Kordaava created a new worldwide calendar based on the Ta Shemau calendar and his own rise to power. In the Kordavan Calendar, time is measured from the moment of Kordaava’s coronation, which took place precisely at midnight on the eve of the first day of Tybi—the New Year.

There are 12 Chaldean months of 30 days each. At the end of the 12th month are five days that are not part of any month. The Chaldean months are as follows, beginning with the first month of the year:

  • Tybi
  • Mechir
  • Phamenoth
  • Pharmouthi
  • Pachon
  • Payni
  • Epiphi
  • Mesore
  • Thoth
  • Phaophi
  • Athyr
  • Choiak

 

Each month has precisely 30 days, each day is precisely 24 hours, each hour is precisely 60 minutes, and each minute is precisely 60 seconds.

Because the dates of years measure time since Kordaava’s coronation, dates in the first year of Kordaava’s rule are simply counted by months and days.

Once the Kordavan Calendar was officially implemented, all historical dates were restated using negative numbers from the point of his coronation.

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For the Kordavan Calendar, we use the real-world Latin forms of names of months from the ancient Egyptian calendar.

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